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The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

When Mrs Day left Greswold in July 2014, she presented the children with a special gift. She has adopted two orphaned elephants on behalf of the pupils of Greswold. The elephants are being looked after by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. The charity works in Kenya protecting the populations of elephants and rhinos which are increasingly under threat.

 

Since being founded in 1977, the charity has successfully hand-raised over 150 infant elephants. The keepers do a fantastic job looking after the orphaned animals in their charge and nursing them back into health. The two elephants that Greswold are fostering are called Kauro and Zongoloni. You can read more about them below.

Kauro   Zongoloni

Poor Kauro had to be rescued by keepers from David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust after he fell down a well. While he was down the well another animal bit off the tip of his trunk. After being removed from the well he was flown to the sanctuary to be looked after.
 

 

It took many weeks and months to get Kauro back to health after his ordeal in the well. His trunk had to heal and he had to get over some an infection he had got from the water.
 

 

Kauro loved being with the other young elephants at the sanctuary and also enjoyed being looked after by the keepers. Now he is going from strength to strength and growing up fast.
 

 

There's lots more about Kauro on the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.

Click here to view Kauro's own webpage.
Click here to view the Kauro gallery to look at the most recent pictures of the elephant.
 



 

Zongoloni is a female elephant who was rescued after her mother was killed by poachers. She was a in a bit of a bad way when the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust found her and hadn't eaten or had water for days. Zongoloni was taken to the sanctuary in a truck.

 


 

Without her mother, the job of looking after Zongoloni was taken on by the keepers. It took her a while to trust humans again after what had happened but she did start to get into a routine at the sanctuary.

 


 

Zongoloni started to enjoy the company of the other elephants in the nursery and now is much happier. She is now living with her friends in the Kibwezi Forest where she should be safe from poachers.

 


There's lots more about Zongoloni on the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.

Click here to view Zongoloni's own webpage.
Click here to view the Zongoloni gallery to look at the most recent pictures of the elephant.
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