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Year 2's Curriculum

In Year 2 we use a topic-based approach to learning and and try to link other subjects into our topic to make them cross-curricular where possible. The topics for Year 2 are:

 

Autumn 1 - The Great Fire of London

Autumn 2 - The UK (a location study)

Spring 1 - Cold Lands (the Arctic and Northern Europe)

Spring 2 - Homes

Summer 1 - Africa / habitats

Summer 2 - Africa / mini-beasts

 

We are endeavouring to take a flexible approach to learning in Year 2, encouraging the children to take responsibility for their own learning and make choices about how they approach tasks. We want to develop a positive attitude towards challenge and foster an ethos where mistakes are opportunities for learning.
 
English

 

During Year 2 we continue to develop the children's reading, writing, grammar and spelling skills. Children are taught in classes and some benefit from small group support - for example for phonics.

We use guided reading with the class teacher and teaching assistant to develop the children's comprehension skills focusing especially on discussing the plot, setting and characters in a book. We develop the children's abilities to express and explain their opinions about a book. There is a strong focus on developing the children's writing both in English lessons and in other topic lessons. We develop the children's use of punctuation and paragraphing. Throughout the year a range of genres are studied, with close links made to other areas of the curriculum.

 

Reading - Word Reading

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • continue to apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent
  • read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught so far, especially recognising alternative sounds for graphemes
  • read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same graphemes as above
  • read words containing common suffixes
  • read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word
  • read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered
  • read aloud books closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation
  • re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading.

 

Reading - Comprehension

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:
    • listening to, discussing and expressing views about a wide range of contemporary and classic poetry, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently
    • discussing the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related
    • becoming increasingly familiar with and retelling a wider range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales
    • being introduced to non-fiction books that are structured in different ways
    • recognising simple recurring literary language in stories and poetry
    • discussing and clarifying the meanings of words, linking new meanings to known vocabulary
    • discussing their favourite words and phrases
    • continuing to build up a repertoire of poems learnt by heart, appreciating these and reciting some, with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear
  • understand both the books that they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by:
    • drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher
    • checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading
    • making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done
    • answering and asking questions
    • predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far
  • participate in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say
  • explain and discuss their understanding of books, poems and other material, both those that they listen to and those that they read for themselves.

 

Spelling

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • spell by:
    • segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes, spelling many correctly
    • learning new ways of spelling phonemes for which one or more spellings are already known, and learn some words with each spelling, including a few common homophones
    • learning to spell common exception words
    • learning to spell more words with contracted forms
    • learning the possessive apostrophe (singular) [for example, the girl’s book]
    • distinguishing between homophones and near-homophones
  • add suffixes to spell longer words, including –ment, –ness, –ful, –less, –ly
  • apply spelling rules and guidance, as listed in English Appendix 1
  • write from memory simple sentences dictated by the teacher that include words using the GPCs, common exception words and punctuation taught so far.

 

Handwriting

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • form lower-case letters of the correct size relative to one another
  • start using some of the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters and understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined
  • write capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower case letters
  • use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.

 

Writing Composition

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • develop positive attitudes towards and stamina for writing by:
    • writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional)
    • writing about real events
    • writing poetry
    • writing for different purposes
  • consider what they are going to write before beginning by:
    • planning or saying out loud what they are going to write about
    • writing down ideas and/or key words, including new vocabulary
    • encapsulating what they want to say, sentence by sentence
  • make simple additions, revisions and corrections to their own writing by:
    • evaluating their writing with the teacher and other pupils
    • re-reading to check that their writing makes sense and that verbs to indicate time are used correctly and consistently, including verbs in the continuous form
    • proof-reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation [for example, ends of sentences punctuated correctly]
  • read aloud what they have written with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear

 

Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • develop their understanding of the concepts set out in English Appendix 2 by:
    • learning how to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly (see English Appendix 2), including full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks, question marks, commas for lists and apostrophes for contracted forms and the possessive (singular)
  • learn how to use:
    • sentences with different forms: statement, question, exclamation, command
    • expanded noun phrases to describe and specify [for example, the blue butterfly]
    • the present and past tenses correctly and consistently including the progressive form
    • subordination (using when, if, that, or because) and co-ordination (using or, and, or but)
    • the grammar for year 2 in English Appendix 2
    • some features of written Standard English
  • use and understand the grammatical terminology in English Appendix 2 in discussing their writing.


The Types of Texts to be Studied in Year 2

The children will read and produce pieces of writing inspired by a range of poetry, non-fiction and narrative texts including both modern and classic writing. These texts provide the context for the learning outlined above. During Year 2, the children will explore these genres and texts:

Autumn Term

Stories and poetry by Julia Donaldson including the Gruffalo

Performance poetry
Diary writing and persuasive writing linked to the Great Fire of London
The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Andersen (a classic text)

Spring Term

Instructional writing

Pumpkin Soup by Helen Cooper

Reports and persuasive writing about the Arctic

Poetry including riddles

Stories set in the past based on Oxford Reading Tree characters


Summer Term

An author study of David Walliams

Narrative writing
Traditional stories from Africa

Mathematics

 

Children are taught in their classes for Mathematics, with some children benefiting from small group work. The children build on their understanding of place value to work with numbers up to 4 digits. They particularly develop their knowledge of times tables and link this to division. During the year, the children develop their use of written methods for calculation following Greswold’s Calculation policy, which sets out how each method such as addition and subtraction is taught. There is also a focus on problem solving.

 

Number and Place Value

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • count in steps of 2, 3, and 5 from 0, and in tens from any number, forward and backward
  • recognise the place value of each digit in a two-digit number (tens, ones)
  • identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations, including the number line
  • compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; use <, > and = signs
  • read and write numbers to at least 100 in numerals and in words
  • use place value and number facts to solve problems.

 

Addition and Subtraction

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • solve problems with addition and subtraction:
    • using concrete objects and pictorial representations, including those involving numbers, quantities and measures
    • applying their increasing knowledge of mental and written methods
  • recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100
  • add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations, and mentally, including:
    • a two-digit number and ones
    • a two-digit number and tens
    • two two-digit numbers
    • adding three one-digit numbers
  • show that addition of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and subtraction of one number from another cannot
  • recognise and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction and use this to check calculations and solve missing number problems.

 

Multiplication and Division

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables, including recognising odd and even numbers
  • calculate mathematical statements for multiplication and division within the multiplication tables and write them using the multiplication (×), division (÷) and equals (=) signs
  • show that multiplication of two numbers can be done in any order (commutative) and division of one number by another cannot
  • solve problems involving multiplication and division, using materials, arrays, repeated addition, mental methods, and multiplication and division facts, including problems in contexts.

 

Fractions

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • recognise, find, name and write fractions one third, one quarter, two quarters and three quarters of a length, shape, set of objects or quantity
  • write simple fractions for example, a half of 6 = 3, and recognise the equivalence of two quarters and a half.

 

Measurement

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm); mass (kg/g); temperature (°C); capacity (litres/ml) to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers, scales, thermometers and measuring vessels
  • compare and order lengths, mass, volume/capacity and record the results using >, < and =
  • recognise and use symbols for pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value
  • find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money
  • solve simple problems in a practical context involving addition and subtraction of money of the same unit, including giving change
  • compare and sequence intervals of time
  • tell and write the time to five minutes, including quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times
  • know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in a day.

 

Geometry - Properties of Shapes

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • identify and describe the properties of 2-D shapes, including the number of sides and line symmetry in a vertical line
  • identify and describe the properties of 3-D shapes, including the number of edges, vertices and faces
  • identify 2-D shapes on the surface of 3-D shapes
  • compare and sort common 2-D and 3-D shapes and everyday objects.

 

Geometry - Position and Direction

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • order and arrange combinations of mathematical objects in patterns and sequences
  • use mathematical vocabulary to describe position, direction and movement, including movement in a straight line and distinguishing between rotation as a turn and in terms of right angles for quarter, half and three-quarter turns (clockwise and anti-clockwise).

 

Statistics

 

Pupils are taught to:

  • interpret and construct simple pictograms, tally charts, block diagrams and simple tables
  • ask and answer simple questions by counting the number of objects in each category and sorting the categories by quantity
  • ask and answer questions about totalling and comparing categorical data.

 

Science

 

At Greswold we are using the Engaging Science scheme as the basis of our Science planning. This scheme was chosen for its strong focus on practical investigation. Pupils are encouraged to be curious and think both scientifically and creatively, using the outdoor environment to learn Scientific ideas in context.


Pupils visit the same habitats and microhabitats at different times of year and explore the seasonal changes in a habitat and a micro-habitat. They continue to develop their observation skills.

Autumn Term

Pupils classify things as living, once alive and never alive. They learn about the characteristics of living things and building and observing a wormery and going outside to hunt for examples of living and non-living things. They look for characteristic of life in plants and establish that plants are living things.

Spring Term

In this term the children learn about animals and their needs. They learn that animals grow until they are adult and that that different animals start life in different forms, some as eggs and some as live births and they look at the needs of the young of different species. Also this term the children learn about plants. Pupils think about the difference between seeds and other objects and work out what a seed is. They plant beans and monitor them weekly, observing, measuring, sketching and photographing them to provide a record of growth. They investigate the basic needs of plants for healthy growth and explore the way that plants change through the seasons.

Summer Term

Pupils explore different materials and begin to link properties with the use of the material, carrying out an investigation to decide on the best material for a particular use and imagining what objects would be like if they were made from “silly” materials. They learn about the life of John Boyd Dunlop who invented the pneumatic tyre. Also in this term pupils spend time learning about familiar and unfamiliar habitats such as woodland and the seashore. They work in the classroom and outdoors to look at animals and plants and further their knowledge of the variety of life in different places and they go pond dipping. They extend their knowledge of the diets of different animals to understand about food chains.

 
Computing

 

We are using Solihull's Scheme of Work to deliver the requirements of the Computing programme of study. This scheme has an annual focus on esafety, using the Internet and finding out about technology pupils will be familiar with. Each year computer science skills and transferable ICT skills are also developed in a progressive way.

Autumn Term

Pupils are taught that digital content can be stored in a variety of devices where it can be organised, manipulated and retrieved. They are taught that there are many ways to exchange information online and that these carry risks. They learn where to go for help when they have concerns about online technologies. They learn to use keywords in given search engines in order to find information to support their learning and to bookmark sites so that they can find them again easily. They begin to evaluate websites and know that not everything on the Internet is true.

Spring Term

Pupils are taught to create and debug simple programs. They understand that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions. They use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs.

Summer Term

Pupils are taught about the different parts of a computer and their functions. They recognise common uses of information technology in and beyond school, learning about how a range of common devices are controlled. They know that some websites and apps advertise purchases and have links that can lead them away from the main site which might not be age appropriate or might ask them to give away personal data. They learn about ways in which personal data is stored and understand the risks in relation to for example online banking. They learn about face to face communication e.g. video conferencing and its associated risks and know what to do if they are worried about anything they see online and who to ask for help.

 
History

 

Autumn Term

During the Autumn term, the children learn about The Great Fire of London. They learn about the events of the fire and it changed our capital city to be a safer place. They will also have the opportunity to learn about key historical figures, such Samuel Pepys.

Spring Term

During the Spring term the children find out about the history of homes. They compare a range of dwellings from Roman and medieval to more recent houses. There is a particular focus on Victorian housing and the children visit back-to-back houses in Birmingham.

Summer Term

There is a geographical focus for this term.

 
Geography

 

Autumn Term


The children learn about their local area and the UK more widely. They locate the school and use geographical language to describe where they live. They use local maps to find local amenities and larger scale maps to find where family members live within the UK.

Spring Term

Geography is the main focus for the Spring Term when the children will learn first about a range of cold lands including the Arctic. The children learn about the natural features of these environments including the flora and fauna. They also find out about how humans adapt to live in these conditions, including their homes, how they find food, transport and jobs

Summer Term

During the Summer Term the children complete a comparative study looking at countries in Africa including Kenya and Tanzania. Again the children look at the physical and human features of the environments.

 
Physical Education (PE)

 

Each week the children have two PE lessons each week - normally an inside PE and and outdoor Games lesson.

Autumn Term

There is a dance focus for this term in our indoor PE sessions. The children produce pieces of work inspired by the story 'The Smartest Giant', and 'Alice in Wonderland'. They also work in pairs and small groups to create a dance based on fireworks. In outdoor games lessons the children develop their racket skills.


Spring Term

During the Spring term the children develop their gymnastic skills. They learn balances, counterbalances and rolls. These are combined into a range of sequences. Outdoors the children develop their athletic skills including running and jumping.

Summer Term

During the Summer Term, the majority of PE lessons will be outside. The children develop a range of skills including throwing and catching. This term the children also learn how to play tri-golf and have an opportunity to compete with other schools in a festival.
 
Art

 

Throughout Year 2, pupils will be taught to develop their techniques, including their control and their use of materials, with creativity, experimentation and an increasing awareness of different kinds of art, craft and design.

Autumn Term

During the Autumn Term the children look at the art of LS Lowry and are encouraged to produce more detailed art work.

Spring Term

In the Spring Term, nature is used as an inspiration for artwork. The children study the architecture of Gaudi and Hunterwasser and develop art using vivid colours and patterns.

Summer Term

In the Summer term, the children draw inspiration from William Morris and look at detail from the natural world.

 
Design and Technology (D&T)

 

Autumn Term


The children plan and cook their own pizzas.

Spring Term

This term the children work with textiles to create their own hand puppet.

Summer Term

The children create a habitat for a mini-beast from a range of different materials.

 
Music

 

The music curriculum is linked to the topics covered in Year 2. The children develop their understanding of dynamics, pitch and rhythm. During the year they also learn to play the ocarina and learn a range of songs.
 
Religious Education (RE)

 

We follow the locally agreed Solihull syllabus for RE.


Autumn Term

This term the children learn about the Jewish faith including its traditions, stories and festivals. The children learn that the Jews’ sacred book is a Scroll called the Torah, understand why the Torah is precious and reflect on what is precious to them. They learn that prayer shawl, called a Tallit, is used by Jews to help them pray and that the Cappel is worn to symbolise God’s greatness. They understand why the Magen David is important to Jews and reflect upon shapes or symbols that are important to them. Also this term the children learn about the symbolism of light in different religious, and learn about the Christian metaphor of Jesus being the light of the world.

Spring Term

In this term the children learn about the Sikh and Christian faiths. They learn why Nanak’s Song is important to Sikhs and how Sikhs show they love Guru Nanak. They understand that for Sikhs, Nanak is a great and much loved teacher. They learn about the Guru Granth Sahib and about the Sikh kirpan. The children learn about the cross as a symbol for Christians. They listen to the story of Jesus’ death and resurrection. They reflect on times when it is hard to understand something and find out that the chalice is used to help Christians remember Jesus.

Summer Term

During the summer term the children learn about prayer in different faiths.  They learn about the Christian Lord’s Prayer and about what a hassock is. The children learn that some people worship in silence, understand how being very quiet helps some people think about God and reflect on how it feels to be silent together. They learn that Hindus believe God is everywhere, understand that there are different ways to think of God and to be able to reflect on what they think God might be like. The children also listen to different stories about the creation of the world. 

 

Personal and Social Development (PSD)

 

We are using the Jigsaw teaching materials to deliver our PSD teaching across Greswold. This scheme offers a mindful approach to the teaching of PHSE through quality teaching, reflection and discussion with the children.

 

Autumn Term

 

 In Autumn Term the themes are ‘Being Me in My World’ and ‘Celebrating Difference’. In the first half term the children think about their hopes and fears for the year ahead. They reflect on rights and responsibilities including the right to learn, linking these to rewards and consequences. As a class the children develop a learning charter. After the half term break the children consider the differences people may have and celebrate their individuality. They investigate healthy foods and what makes a healthy snack. They learn how conflict between friends can be managed effectively as part of learning about relationships more widely.

 

Spring Term

 

In the Spring Term the themes covered are ‘Dreams and Goals’ and ‘Healthy Me’.  The children discuss setting realistic goals and consider the steps needed to achieve them. They reflect on their own strengths and consider how persevering when things get difficult or working with others can help their learning to improve. They also take part in a group challenge and celebrate their successes. After half term there is a focus on health. The children consider what being ‘healthy’ means and how diet, exercise and relaxation can all contribute. They learn ways to calm down when they are feeling stressed. The children also reflect on what makes a healthy friendship and how to be a good friend.

 

Summer Term

 

‘Relationships’ and ‘Changing Me’ are the two themes in the Summer Term.  The children reflect on families and how many different families exist. They learn about personal space and learn strategies to resolve conflicts with their friends. The children consider the role of trust and when it secrets may need to be shared. In the last half term the children reflect on the progress they have made in Year 2 and also that they are now more grown up. They learn some basic information about how humans change through their life cycle and celebrate the independence they have developed over the academic year. The children are taught strategies to be assertive and look forward to moving into Year 3 in a positive way as part of our transition work.

 

Curriculum Enrichment

 

In addition to the academic curriculum outlined above, Year 2 also offers:


Harvest Festival.

A educational visit to St Alphege Church at Christmas to learn about the nativity story.
A production in which children have opportunities to sing, act and dance.
A residential visit to Dunfield House.

Tri-golf coaching and festival.

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